the blogs & reblogs of an islamist-feminist

twitter: @ralhayek
Student of Islam ,the Near East, & Women's Studies. lover of (classic) English & Arabic Literature. Art. Reader. Writer. Avid Tea Drinker, Notebook & Pen collector.

“Many of us have preconceived notions about people’s accents. We find Western European accents—French, British, Castilian Spanish, Italian—relatively appealing, while Asian and Mexican accents are experienced as unintelligible or offensive… if an employee speaks French well and English only moderately well, we aren’t bothered. however, if Filipinos, for example, speak Tagalog to one another at work, the assumptions are that they are purposefully excluding English-speakers, that they are not trying to learn English, and that they don’t care. A mean-spirited quality is attributed to the behavior.”

—   

Frances E. Kendall, Understanding White Privilege 

White supremacy doesn’t regard non-white languages as real languages, it regards them as deviant forms of communication reduced to broad ethnic strokes (“Indian”, “Asian”, “African”) that is unacceptable because it is seen as an affront to white/euro hegemony.

(via notafuckingwizard)

(Source: brutereason, via becauseiamawoman)

(Source: -teesa-, via anrawrasaurus)

redphilistine said: Hi, I just saw your reply to my post. Thank you. Do you mind if I ask a couple of questions? Out of all my family and family friends (both Palestinian and Jordanian), I'm the only one who is against the monarchy and I'm curious to understand the nature of the tribal opposition that you mentioned.

Ahlein:) My response to the tribal bit is more anecodtal because its in my family, so of thats all right i can share that:)
But my more academic response is based on research and interviews i had with some female members of the islamic action front. Sorry for the late reply, i forget there’s a msg option 0_0
Could you reply to my email? Or let me know yours?
Ruwa.alhayek@gmail.com

natgeotravel:

Reflections: A young boy casts a striking comparison to an aging man lost in a book on a ferry in Istanbul. 
Photograph by Merve Ates, National Geographic Your Shot

natgeotravel:

Reflections: A young boy casts a striking comparison to an aging man lost in a book on a ferry in Istanbul. 

Photograph by Merve Ates, National Geographic Your Shot

(via hannahsofia)

cishettears:

liberal feminism more like “capitalism: it’s not just for boys”

(via szaghloul)

beckendorph:

huffingtonpost:

Hey, White America, You Need To Hear What These Ferguson Kids Have To Say

In a new video from social justice-oriented T-shirt company FCKH8, several Ferguson children lampoon the excuses white people give to avoid getting involved in ending discrimination in America and deliver a call to action to stomp out racism.

Watch the full video and see these kids explain how racism is still a huge part of even getting an interview for a job.

THIS IS THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN

(via chaiandpoetry)

aniggainrio:

After a 20-minute flight over the city of New York, Stephen Wiltshire, diagnosed with autism, draws the whole town with only his memory.

aniggainrio:

After a 20-minute flight over the city of New York, Stephen Wiltshire, diagnosed with autism, draws the whole town with only his memory.

(via mojarradi)

When Van Gogh was a young man in his early twenties, he was in London studying to be a clergyman. He had no thought of being an artist at all. He sat in his cheap little room writing a letter to his younger brother in Holland, whom he loved very much. He looked out his window at a watery twilight, a thin lampost, a star, and he said in his letter something like this: “it is so beautiful I must show you how it looks.” And then on his cheap ruled note paper, he made the most beautiful, tender little drawing of it.

When I read this letter of Van Gogh’s it comforted me very much and seemed to throw a clear light on the whole road of Art. Before, I thought that to produce a work of painting or literature, you scowled and thought long and ponderously and weighed everything solemnly and learned everything that all artists had ever done aforetime, and what their influences and schools were, and you were extremely careful about ‘design’ and ‘balance’ and getting ‘interesting planes’ into your painting, and avoided, with the most astringent severity, showing the faintest ‘academical’ tendency, and were strictly modern. And so on and so on.

But the moment I read Van Gogh’s letter I knew what art was, and the creative impulse. It is a feeling of love and enthusiasm for something, and in a direct, simple, passionate and true way, you try to show this beauty in things to others, by drawing it.

And Van Gogh’s little drawing on the cheap note paper was a work of art because he loved the sky and the frail lamppost against it so seriously that he made the drawing with the most exquisite conscientiousness and care.

—   

Brenda UelandIf You Want to Write: A Book about Art, Independence and Spirit (via nyctaeus)

Wow. Rarely do things move me.

(via theoceanwithme)

(via aurignacian)

floralls:

(by sinister kid)
mostafa-hamza:

رضوى عاشور - الطنطورية

mostafa-hamza:

رضوى عاشور - الطنطورية

(via alittlepieceofground)

floralls:

Whispers waltz around our dreams (by holding onto gravity)

floralls:

Whispers waltz around our dreams (by holding onto gravity)
floralls:

3 September (by Joke Gaasendam)

floralls:

3 September (by Joke Gaasendam)